Holy Trinity Church, Messingham

Restoration – Our Vision

‘Revealing, Sharing and Caring for our Heritage’

Our objective is to secure the future of Holy Trinity as a living place of worship and to preserve this Grade II* listed building for the use and enjoyment of both current and future generations.

 

An architect’s inspection (Quinquennial Inspection) in Nov 2013 and a subsequent more detailed roof report in March 2014 identified significant problems with the Westmorland slated roof, some issues with supporting timber work, and other serious water ingress problems caused by faulty and inadequate rainwater management and drainage. These issues resulted in Holy Trinity being placed on the “Heritage at Risk” register by Historic England in August 2016 following a visit by Penny Evans - Heritage at Risk Surveyor, Historic England, East Midlands. Following consultation with the Lincoln Diocesan Advisory Committee an aspirational project ‘Revealing, Sharing and Caring for our heritage’ was drafted under the expert guidance of Brian Foxley RIBA AABC with a projected total cost approaching £1 million.

Following wide ranging research and exploration of potential funding sources it was agreed to phase the project with the first phase focusing on addressing structural repair needs most negatively impacting on the integrity of the building and the preservation of key heritage features.

Phase 1

In Aug 2015 a first round application was submitted to the Heritage Lottery Fund under the “Grants For Places of Worship” scheme to address the identified roofing and rainwater management needs.  A first round pass of up to £229,600, including development funding of £26,200 was awarded in December 2015. £13,700 of this related to costs associated with delivery of an activity plan engaging people with the heritage of Holy Trinity.

Following the death of the project architect and related consultation with HLF and Historic England, Knox McConnell were contracted as project architect in September 2016 and a second round pass was secured in Dec 2017.

Technical investigations commissioned in the HLF development phase revealed a previously unknown issue with the tower roof supporting timbers and the lead covering, the projected cost of this additional work being £11,859. As this was not included in the first round HLF application and extended the project costs beyond that allocated by HLF.  Additional funds to support this work were secured from All Churches Trust and Lincolnshire churches Trust

Construction work commenced in April 2018 with completion in mid November.

The structural work addressed in phase 1 focused on:

  • Replacement of all Westmorland slate roof coverings
  • Localised repairs to roof structure timbers
  • Installation of a redesigned rainwater collection and disposal system  -  gutters, downpipes, underground pipe work, soakaways
  • Roofing related high level stonework repairs
  • Strengthening of the tower roof supporting timbers and replacement of the lead roof covering.

The main contractor for phase 1 was Historic Property Restoration Ltd with Martin Brooks Ltd of Sheffield as the specialist roofing sub-contractor. Architectural services were provided by Stephen McConnell of Knox McConnell Architects Ltd.

The project also involved work to reveal more about and share the heritage and story of Holy Trinity through production of a website and the first two of a planned series of visitor information leaflets. Heritage skills awareness and training opportunities were provided for sector workers and trainees, the general public, school teachers and their pupils through partnerships with heritage skills professionals and volunteers.

Later Phases

As the roof and drainage related structural work in phase 1 progresses we will continue working, in liaison with our architects, on confirming the specification for future phases in order for the church to more appropriately meet the needs of the current and future generations. Further grants will be sought through the Heritage Lottery Fund and other sources and local fund raising will be pursued with the intention of moving onto the next phase as soon as realistically possible after completion of the first.

Following consultation and research, issues identified for consideration include:

  • Restoration of medieval stained glass in response to needs specified in a recent technical survey
  • Identifying seating arrangements to meet the needs of a wider range of uses
  • Addressing the current lack of toilet facilities in the church
  • Identify hospitality needs arising from future intended uses in order to specify efficient and hygienic facilities
  • Specifying a heating system appropriate to the future uses of the building and appropriate to its construction
  • Meeting current Health and Safety and legislative requirements including measures to improve energy efficiency
  • Meeting disabled access and use expectations, requirements and legislation
  • Specifying an electrical installation to meet projected future uses
  • Specifying a sound system to meet projected future needs
  • Identifying future IT needs and specifying appropriate requirements
  • Identifying and addressing storage needs in line with planned usage
  • Providing safe access appropriate to using all parts of the church, including the bell tower
  • Repositioning / reconfiguring the organ to reduce loss of light, and expose to view currently hidden stained glass – without compromising its highly regarded musical quality

Restoration Gallery

Heritage Skills Day-Roof Tour

Heritage Skills Day-Roof Tour

Heritage Skills day-Fixing slates

Heritage Skills day-Fixing slates

Heritage Skills day-Cutting slate

Heritage Skills day-Cutting slate

Our challenge

Our challenge
Extensive roof and drainage related issues.

April 2018- work started

April 2018- work started
Scaffolding erected - nave and south aisle stripped

Identifying repair needs

Identifying repair needs
Stephen McConnell – Architect – Knox McConnell Architects Ltd, Andy Hatton – Project manager – Historic Property Restoration Ltd, Paul Wassell – Master roofer – Martin Brookes Specialist Roofing Ltd

Rotting timber

Rotting timber
North east end of nave roof

Rotting timber

Rotting timber
Rotting timber caused by ingress of water and consequential insect attack

Structural engineer assessment

Structural engineer assessment
John Ruddy (Structural engineer) assessing the structural impact of rotted timbers with the project architect and site manager

Pointing on east end of nave

Pointing on east end of nave
Re-pointing the east end of the nave in ..................

Spot the beetle

Spot the beetle
Tim Floyd (Timber specialist) was recalled to assess newly revealed insect attack.

Tower roof timbers.jpg

Tower roof timbers.jpg

Tower roof beams.jpg

Tower roof beams.jpg

Tower roof

Tower roof
Newly installed additional central beam - an unusual view of the bells and fittings!

HPR joiners hard at work

HPR joiners hard at work
Rotted section of wall plate replaced with ............. Rafters strengthened by placing additional timbers in tandem.

Tower roof-lead work.jpg

Tower roof-lead work.jpg

Keeping water on the move

Keeping water on the move
New lead work designed to move water away from challenging detail where water ingress had been a significant problem

Selecting, sorting and trimming reclaimed slate

Selecting, sorting and trimming reclaimed slate
Considerable time was spent selecting, sorting and trimming slate in order to make effective use of an expensive material of limited availability

Nave south

Nave south
Sorted slates laid out ready for fixing with heavy gauge copper nails

Nave south

Nave south
Re-slating commenced with the nave south

Nave south / south aisle

Nave south / south aisle

Nave north

Nave north

Nave south and south aisle

Nave south and south aisle
Nave covered in new and south aisle in reclaimed Westmorland slate

South aisle

South aisle
Selecting and fixing reclaimed slates - final courses

Chancel south

Chancel south

Chancel south

Chancel south
Note the diminishing sizes of slates as courses progress up the roof

New cast iron rainwater goods

New cast iron rainwater goods
Solution to moving water around an awkward detail - previously a site of water ingress

Chancel south

Chancel south
New slates in

New drainage runs

New drainage runs
New drainage runs being installed. Two runs brought together at junction and then run through silt trap before discharge into soak-away

New drainage runs

New drainage runs

Soakaways installed

Soakaways installed
Grassed areas re-seeded after installation of new drainage runs and soak-aways.

New cast iron rainwater goods

New cast iron rainwater goods
New cast iron rainwater goods. Newly installed drainage pipe work leads to through silt traps to new soak-aways.

Reinstated path

Reinstated path
Pathway made good with newly laid asphalt after installation of drainage runs.

Construction work completed

Construction work completed
Looking proud again! Phase 1 completed.

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